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Curated research library of TV news clips regarding the NSA, its oversight and privacy issues, 2009-2014

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Primary curation & research: Robin Chin, Internet Archive TV News Researcher; using TV News Archive service.

Speakers

Edward Snowden
whistleblower
CSPAN2 03/11/2014
Snowden: The NSA, the sort of global mass surveillance that’s prying at all of these countries, not just the U.S. and it’s important to remember that this is a global issue. They’re setting fire to the future of the internet. The people who are in this room now you guys are the firefighters. We need you to fix this.
Jay Carney
White House Press Secretary
CSPAN2 03/18/2014
Reporter: The Washington Post is now reporting that the NSA has the ability to not only collect metadata about phone calls made and numbers but that the calls themselves are recorded and can be played back. These calls from foreign countries. Can you comment on that? Carne: I can't. I haven’t seen the report and don't have a response to it except to say that we don't, as a general rule, comment on every specific allegation or report. We made clear that activity the NSA and the intelligence community engages in. The fact that they are bound by our laws and the oversight of three branches of government. We also note as I did the other day the steps that the President announced in January to significantly reform our activity in order to provide the American people even greater assurance about these programs. But I don't have anything specific on that report.
Mike Rogers
U.S. Representative (R-Mich.), Chair, House Select Committee on Intelligence
CSPAN 03/25/2014
Rogers: I passionately believe that this program saved American lives. Believe it was legal. it was overseen. It was passed by congress. Now, the review committees that got to section 215, no one found any illegal activities or misuse. So we know that the program served its purpose, was legal and had the proper level of oversight. Now, it did create discomfort with Americans. And we knew one thing when we walked into this negotiation, that if we were going to continue the ability to protect Americans against foreign terrorists making efforts to call into the United States, we a program that accomplished that.
Mike Rogers
U.S. Representative (R-Mich.), Chair, House Select Committee on Intelligence
CSPAN 03/25/2014
Rogers: What we will ban under section 215 is the use of FISA to collect bulk electronic communication records, email, metadata and internet metadata, the use of FISA to collect bulk sensitive personal records, library records, firearm sales records, tax return records, etc. And we can go into more detail in the questions period. But that is a primary concern of both the average Americans who were concerned about the government holding large quantities of phone metadata. Again, no content, no names, but just the metadata. We think again we've found a way to do that.
Dutch Ruppersberger
U.S. Representative D-Maryland, Ranking Member on the Intelligence Committee
CSPAN 03/25/2014
Ruppersberger: We will be taking a warrant, the F.B.I. will be taking a warrant, giving it to the phone companies and then we will -- they will have to pass what they call the RAS test, Reasonable Articulable Suspicion. That means that if in fact, let me give you an example, if there's a terrorist at a safe house in Yemen and that terrorist, known terrorist to us, calls the united states, then that would be the RAS test that we would need in order to get the warrant to the phone company – to get the information. What's more important and what's so important in our country, which makes our country so strong, the checks and balances, and the court will be involved in the process. In the pre-process they will be involved with overseeing the procedures that we use.
Dutch Ruppersberger
U.S. Representative D-Maryland, Ranking Member on the Intelligence Committee
CSPAN 03/25/2014
Ruppersberger: In the post, though, the courts will evaluate every individual case, the RAS test, as it occurs. And that just doesn't happen now. So, we have, again, to reiterate. we have the F.B.I. going to the providers, getting this information. Then we have to pass the RAS test at that point and then the courts will oversee that post. And that will be done very quickly also. We also want to deal with some other issues. Those issues will be transparency. We think it's very important that the public know how important and what the mission is of our intelligence communities and how they work with our military to save our country from terrorist attacks.
Barack Obama
President
KQED 03/25/2014
Mathisen: The Obama Administration proposed sweeping changes to the NSA's surveillance of American's phone records. It now puts the burden of storing and searching phone records of millions of people on phone companies instead of on the government. The President says the changes would help ease concerns about privacy while still keeping Americans safe. Obama: Overall I'm confident that it allows to us do what is necessary in order to deal with the dangers of the terrorists attacks but does so in a way that addresses some of the concerns that people have raised. Mathisen: Federal regulations already require phone companies to hold onto so-called metadata on all phone calls for 18 months. But that does not include records on the caller's names or the content of those calls. the government and telecom giants monitor phone calls.
Saxby Chambliss
U.S. Senator R-Georgia
CSPAN2 04/03/2014
Chambliss: We just concluded the vote on the declassification of the executive summary the findings and conclusions as well as the minority views. I voted in favor of the declassification for this reason. We need to get this behind us. This committee’s got important work that needs to be done. I was never in favor of this report being done. I think it was a waste of time. We had already had a report done by the armed services committee on this issue and this is a chapter in our past that should have already been closed. However, the general public has the right to now know what was done and what’s in the report from the standpoint of the executive summary, the findings and conclusions and as well as the way the minority feels about it. So I voted to declassify that and then the general public and make up their minds
Saxby Chambliss
U.S. Senator R-Georgia
CSPAN2 04/03/2014
Chambliss: So I voted to declassify that (the executive summary findings on the CIA interrogation and detention policies) and then the general public can make up their minds about whether or not this was done properly and whether or not in fact as we point out specifically in the minority report, that there was information gleaned from this program which led not only to the take down of bin laden, but to the interruption and disruption of other terrorist plots over a period of years.
Dianne Feinstein
U.S. Senator (D-CA), Chairman of Senate Select Committee on Intelligence
CSPAN2 04/03/2014
Feinstein: The Senate Select Committee on Intelligence has voted to send to the President the summary and findings and conclusions of the report on the interrogation and detention of more than 100 detainees. The vote was 11-3. I will not discuss who voted how but members are free to discuss if they want, how they voted. The purpose of this review was to uncover the facts behind this secret program and the results I think were shocking. The report exposes brutality that stands in stark contrast to our values as a nation. It chronicles a stained on our history that must never be allowed to happen again.
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